Plantar Fasciitis HUB 

GENERAL PLANTAR FASCIITIS INFORMATION FROM THE LEG TEAM

Plantar Fasciitis - What is it?


Plantar Fasciitis Heel Pain - What is it? Click here to try our APP for Plantar Fasciitis https://plantar-faciitis.fitterapp.app/ Plantar Fasciitis is a commonly reported condition which ultimately results in heel Pain. Plantar Fasciitis is an injury to the large fibrous band of connective tissue under the arch and heel in which the plantar fascia becomes sore and thickened. The Plantar fascia is referred to as the plantar aponeurosis and is made up primarily of longitudinally positioned collagen fibres. It is anatomically divided into three bands that originate from the heel and progress forwards. These are known as the medial, central and lateral bands of the Plantar Fascia. It is important to understand that the Plantar Fascia is fascia not muscle and cannot contract in any way. However, a healthy plantar fascia does lengthen and functions almost like a spring to help support the arch. This is achieved as the plantar fascia is tensioned through the great toe extension mechanism (Windlass Mechanism). As it is tensioned it helps support the arch. Currently the medical literature reports that Plantar fasciitis is a degenerative process of micro tears of the plantar fascia in which fascial thickening and scarring as well as a breakdown of collagen results rather than inflammatory changes. Hence many referring to this condition now as Plantar Fasciopathy rather than Plantar Fasciitis (which means inflamed plantar fascia).




Plantar Fasciitis - Some simple facts:


Some simple facts: Click here to try our APP for Plantar Fasciitis https://plantar-faciitis.fitterapp.app/ ​​​​​​​

  • Plantar Fasciitis is the number 1 adult heel pain complaint
  • Approximately 10% of population will experience Plantar Fasciitis at some time during their life
  • Plantar Fasciitis is most common in women
  • Plantar Fasciitis is most common in people aged between 35 and 60.
  • Plantar Fasciitis is the most googled foot injury with over 2 million people per day using this search term




Plantar Fasciitis - Why do I have it?


Plantar Fasciitis - Why do I have this heel pain all of a sudden? Click here to try our APP for Plantar Fasciitis https://plantar-faciitis.fitterapp.app/ The cause of Plantar Fasciitis is unclear but we do know that: Pain in the heel is normally caused from the over working of the plantar foot muscles and the planter fascia. Plantar Fasciitis risk factors also include excessive weight gain, long periods of standing poor footwear change in loads (ie more steps) as well as hyper pronation syndromes. At our private clinic in Australia we see Plantar Fasciitis heel pain all year round but we think it is particularly prevalent during the summer months when people are more active and more likely to be barefoot. At the Lower Extremity Group we also see a trend that correlates weakness in particular foot musculature with Plantar Fasciitis heel pain.




Plantar Fasciitis - How can we be sure its Plantar Fasciitis and nothing else?


How can we be sure its Plantar Fasciitis and nothing else? Click here to try our APP for Plantar Fasciitis https://plantar-faciitis.fitterapp.app/ There is no current gold standard for the diagnosis of Plantar Fasciitis . Diagnostically however, Palpation of the plantar fascia is usually performed by your doctor or therapist can be used to confirm the location of pain. Ultrasound scan of the plantar fascia can confirm a thickening of the various bands of the fascia also. Also a plain Xray sometimes utilised to rule out any other pathology such as heel spurs. Click here to try our APP for Plantar Fasciitis https://plantar-faciitis.fitterapp.app/




Plantar Fasciitis - Why do I have it?


Plantar Fasciitis - Why do I have this heel pain all of a sudden? Click here to try our APP for Plantar Fasciitis https://plantar-faciitis.fitterapp.app/ The cause of Plantar Fasciitis is unclear but we do know that: Pain in the heel is normally caused from the over working of the plantar foot muscles and the planter fascia. Plantar Fasciitis risk factors also include excessive weight gain, long periods of standing poor footwear change in loads (ie more steps) as well as hyper pronation syndromes. At our private clinic in Australia we see Plantar Fasciitis heel pain all year round but we think it is particularly prevalent during the summer months when people are more active and more likely to be barefoot. At the Lower Extremity Group we also see a trend that correlates weakness in particular foot musculature with Plantar Fasciitis heel pain. Click here to try our APP for Plantar Fasciitis https://plantar-faciitis.fitterapp.app/





LATEST TRENDS

Trends and Internet mysths


Click here to try our APP for Plantar Fasciitis https://plantar-faciitis.fitterapp.app/ Internet Myths - Debunking the millions of internet myths about Plantar Fasciitis. Unfortunately there are no magic cures no magic insoles no magic potions. Expensive Orthotic insoles may help and they should be tried in conjunction with a. good management plan but they are not a miracle cure and should not form he only treatment modality used for the treatment and management of Plantar Fasciitis. Many online magic cures are revolving around the sale of these insoles. Heel raises may help as they are reported to take some workload off the Achilles. Again these are only 1 part of a good management plan. Stretches may help, massage may help, exercises may help. These need to be well structured and advised for a sound management plan. The most important thing is magic cures don’t exist and thats why you need a structured and easy to follow approach to managing this painful heel condition. Click here to try our APP for Plantar Fasciitis https://plantar-faciitis.fitterapp.app/





TOP TIPS

TIP 1


Treating Plantar Fasciitis heel pain is actually very easy. But there are NO MAGIC CURES!! no one off miracles that magically fix their pain!!! TOP Tip #1: USE AN EVIDENCE BASED TREATMENT PLAN It may not seem obvious, but you are guessing at what to do until you have a solid management program that contains exactly what you are required to do each and every day to help your Plantar Fasciitis Heel Pain. This is the most important step without a plan you are flying blind as to how to treat Plantar Fasciitis Heel pain. Current research is indicates that we must base our treatment for this condition off similar protocols to those used for the treatment of tendinopathies in the human body. These plans involve a lot of research based evidence that supports the use of the therapeutic modalities we will instruct you on in our rehab program.




TIP 2


TOP Tip #2: YOUR PLAN NEEDS TO SIMPLE AND ACHIEVABLE Once you have a solid plan of attack for how to treat and manage this Plantar Fasciitis Heel Pain Next, your plan needs to be simple enough for a anyone to be able understand, achieve and execute This means that the exercises need to be simple and they must be able to be done by anyone anywhere and they need to know why they are doing these things to help their Plantar Fasciitis pain. I have seen other therapists plans which have the client doing literally 20 minutes of calf stretches and nothing else. These old plans are no longer evidence based.





RECOMMENDED MEDICAL LITERATURE HUB

Plantar fasciitis: A review of treatments Lindsey Luffy 1, John Grosel, Randall Thomas, Eric So


JAAPA. 2018 Jan;31(1):20-24. doi: 10.1097/01.JAA.0000527695.76041.99. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29227320/ Abstract Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain in the United States. Many treatments are available and differ in efficacy and cost. This article discusses the theorized causes for plantar fasciitis and various treatments.




Strength training for plantar fasciitis and the intrinsic foot musculature: A systematic review - Dean Huffer 1, Wayne Hing 2, Richard Newton 3, Mike Clair 4


Phys Ther Sport. 2017 Mar;24:44-52. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2016.08.008. Epub 2016 Aug 18.
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27692740/
Abstract The aim was to critically evaluate the literature investigating strength training interventions in the treatment of plantar fasciitis and improving intrinsic foot musculature strength. A search of PubMed, CINHAL, Web of Science, SPORTSDiscus, EBSCO Academic Search Complete and PEDRO using the search terms plantar fasciitis, strength, strengthening, resistance training, intrinsic flexor foot, resistance training. Seven articles met the eligibility criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the modified Downs and Black checklist. All articles showed moderate to high quality, however external validity was low. A comparison of the interventions highlights significant differences in strength training approaches to treating plantar fasciitis and improving intrinsic strength. It was not possible to identify the extent to which strengthening interventions for intrinsic musculature may benefit symptomatic or at risk populations to plantar fasciitis. There is limited external validity that foot exercises, toe flexion against resistance and minimalist running shoes may contribute to improved intrinsic foot musculature function. Despite no plantar fascia thickness changes being observed through high-load plantar fascia resistance training there are indications that it may aid in a reduction of pain and improvements in function. Further research should use standardised outcome measures to assess intrinsic foot musculature strength and plantar fasciitis symptoms.




Comparative effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave, ultrasound, low-level laser therapy, noninvasive interactive neurostimulation, and pulsed radiofrequency treatment for treating plantar fasciitis: A systematic review and network meta-analysis Xian Li 1, Li Zhang 2, Shuming Gu 1, Jianfeng Sun 1, Zongshi Qin 3, Jiaji Yue 4, Yu Zhong 5, Ning Ding 2, Rui Gao 6


Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Oct;97(43):e12819. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30412072/ Abstract Background: Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of adult heel pain. The aim of this study is to comprehensively compare the effectiveness of various therapies for plantar fasciitis using network meta-analysis. Methods: Studies were comprehensively searched on Embase, MEDLINE via PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) up to December 4, 2017. Randomized controlled trials that used extracorporeal shock wave therapy, ultrasound, ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment (UG-PRF), intracorporeal pneumatic shock therapy (IPST), low-level laser therapy (LLLT), and noninvasive interactive neurostimulation (NIN) for the treatment of plantar fasciitis were included. The primary outcome is change in pain relief. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Quality assessment was performed using the GRADE system. Results: Nineteen trials with 1676 patients with plantar fasciitis plantar fasciitis were included. In the pair-wise meta-analysis, radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (RSW), LLLT, and IPST showed a significant pooled reduction in the visual analogue scale (VAS) compared with placebo at 0 to 6 weeks [mean difference (MD) = 6.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): (6.04, -7.16); MD = 2.34, 95% CI: (1.60, 3.08); MD = 2.24, 95% CI: (1.44, 3.04), respectively]. Compared with placebo, UG-PRF [MD = 2.31, 95% CI: (1.26, 3.36)] and high-intensity focused extracorporeal shock wave (H-FSW) [MD = 0.82, 95% CI: (0.20, 1.45)] showed superior pain-relieving effects at 2 to 4 months; UG-PRF [MD = 1.11, 95% CI: (0.07, 2.15)] and IPST [MD = 4.92, 95% CI: (4.11, 5.73)] showed superior effects at 6 to 12 months. In the network meta-analysis, only RSW induced significant pain reduction compared with placebo at 0 to 6 weeks [MD = 3.67, 95% CI: (0.31, 6.9)]. No significant differences were found for the 2 to 4-month and 6 to 12-month periods because of the wide 95% CIs. Conclusions: We recommend treating plantar fasciitis with RSW. The commonly used ultrasound and focused extracorporeal shock wave (FSW) therapies can be considered as alternative treatment candidates. IPST, NIN, and LLLT may potentially be better alternatives, although their superiority should be confirmed by additional comprehensive evidence.PROSPERO registration number: PROSPERO (CRD42015017353).




Effectiveness of Mechanical Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis: A Systematic Review - Dorianne Schuitema, Christian Greve, Klaas Postema, Rienk Dekker, Juha M Hijmans


J Sport Rehabil. 2019 Oct 18;29(5):657-674. doi: 10.1123/jsr.2019-0036. Print 2020 Jul 1.
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31629333/
Abstract Context: Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common foot injuries. Several mechanical treatment options, including shoe inserts, ankle-foot orthoses, tape, and shoes are used to relieve the symptoms of plantar fasciitis. Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of mechanical treatment in the management of plantar fasciitis. Evidence acquisition: The review was reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, and Cochrane up to March 8, 2018. Two independent reviewers screened eligible articles and assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool. Evidence synthesis: A total of 43 articles were included in the study, evaluating 2837 patients. Comparisons were made between no treatment and treatment with insoles, tape, ankle-foot orthoses including night splints and shoes. Tape, ankle-foot orthoses, and shoes were also compared with insoles. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 5 days to 12 months. Cointerventions were present in 26 studies. Conclusions: Mechanical treatment can be beneficial in relieving symptoms related to plantar fasciitis. Contoured full-length insoles are more effective in relieving symptoms related to plantar fasciitis than heel cups. Combining night splints or rocker shoes with insoles enhances improvement in pain relief and function compared with rocker shoes, night splints, or insoles alone. Taping is an effective short-term treatment. Future studies should aim to improve methodological quality using blinding, allocation concealment, avoid cointerventions, and use biomechanical measures of treatment effects.





PLANTAR FASCIITIS GOLD STANDARD FOR TREATMENT

Plantar Fasciitis - GOLD STANDARD TREATMENT


The Lower Extremity Group offers to you the Gold Standard in Lower extremity injury rehabilitation. We utilise a World Class rehabilitation program for Plantar Fascial pain, and this is deilvered to you online in the comfort of your own home. All you have to do is follow our easy to use evidence based plan to treat and manage your Plantar Fascia Pain. This online program contains 4 complete weeks of revolutionary rehabilitation guides to help you manage and treat your Plantar Fascia issues every single day. We deliver our evidence-based daily Plantar Fascia management program via our amazing app, ( Click here to try our APP for Plantar Fasciitis https://plantar-faciitis.fitterapp.app/) which is very easy for you to follow and includes 28 days of;

  • Progressive neuromuscular exercises that will strengthen the muscles around the foot and ankle and help reduce the pain associated with Plantar Fasciitis.
  • 5 progressive levels of evidence based rehabilitation that do not require expensive equpiment
  • Passive and dynamic mobility exercises to increase range of motion and tissue extensibility of mucles and fascia
  • ​Myofascial massage exercises
  • Using the app will enable you to understand when to apply the various exercises to help manage Plantar Fascia Pain
  • Plus more
We offer online consultations as a part of the rehabiliation precess to help you rehabilitate and manage your Plantar Fascia Issues. ​Our experienced therapists have taken these aforementioned technical modalities and simplified them into easy to watch videos for you to follow and complete. These are delivered daily to your smart device within our Plantar Fascia management program. Book in today - Online or in clinic





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